The Law Enforcement Social Media Blog

The authoritative resource for news and information about law enforcement social media. From Facebook and Twitter to YouTube and Nixle, we discuss social media and its use as the ultimate community policing tool.

School Brawls, Defiant Students and Law Enforcement Social Media

Recently, there have been incidents involving school resource officers, patrol officers, and school administrators encountering belligerent, defiant students who are challenging the legality and the authority of these leaders in a school setting. 

When these incidents occur, cell phone video, is usually posted on social media, either during the incident, or immediately following it. As you can imagine, these videos, along with the attached comments, are usually one-sided and lead the viewer towards forming a particular opinion of the incident. Rarely, do the videos show the totality of the circumstances, as well as the moments prior to the record button being pushed.

In addition to these videos, America is seeing first hand the student-on-student violence which happens every day in our schools across the country. These videos are published on social media with the pure intent of causing harm to the victims and their families, as well as an insurmountable amount of embarrassment for the victims.

The Advantage of An Interactive Show Leads To Open Dialogue

Our original intention with this episode was to discuss tips and techniques for dealing with these types of videos once they are published on social media. However, we quickly found there were members of the community who wanted to solely discuss one of the incidents. This particular incident involved a South Carolina student who refused to stop using her phone, and refused to leave the classroom, after being asked by the teacher, school principal and a police officer. The police officer eventually removed the student from the chair, placed her on the ground and handcuffed her. 

Due to the intensity of the conversation, we ran out of time to discuss the tips and techniques we wanted to share with our law enforcement viewers. We will attempt to reschedule this show in the future, but until then:

  1. When video emerges which has a recording of a department member in a controversial situation, immediately review the video and any posts, social media platforms, hashtags, etc., so you can know the extent of the growth of the video.
  2. Follow your department's protocol for notifying supervisors and personnel involved.
  3. Acknowledge the video's presence on the particular platform or platforms where it has emerged and post something like, "The XYZ police department has been made aware of this video and is reviewing the incident. Our department is committed to providing the most professional service at all times, and we expect all members to adhere to this value as well. Should you have any further information or additional video which would aid in our review of this incident, please contact us at (555) 555-5555. Thank you in advance for your understanding and support of our department."
  4. Continue to publish your normal content, however, be cognizant of any posts which might cause aggravation to the incident or those involved.
  5. Should additional comments appear on your social media platforms in regards to the questionable video, reach out to other social media managers and seek their guidance on how to further handle the posts. Some might warrant addressing, while others may need to go unanswered. 

Introducing Tony Moore

Tony MooreTony MooreTony Moore is a deputy sheriff with a large southern California law enforcement agency. His expertise is in social media and internet investigations, crypto-currencies, emerging internet trends and public information. He is a certified POST (Peace Officer Standards and Training) instructor with the State of California, teaching classes on social media, public information, internet investigations and computer forensics via the California Department of Justice (CADOJ).

Tony also instructs for Basic Cybercrime Investigation Course at the University of Southern California (USC) Viterbi School of Engineering. He’s been a guest speaker at the International Association Chiefs of Police (IACP) Annual Conference, Social Media, the Internet and Law Enforcement (SMILE) Conference, the Los Angeles Police Department’s (LAPD) Annual Detective Symposium, the California Crime Prevention Officers Association (CCPOA) Convention, and CFED West’s Annual Convention on the same topics.

In 2015, Tony was the recipient of the Peace Officers Association of Los Angeles County (POALAC) - Centurion Award for "Excellence in Innovative Communications and Government Social Media" and the Golden Post Award for "Best Use of Social Media in Solving Crime."

white_logo.png

Search